How does Shirley Jackson use setting to interest the reader in the beginning of The Lottery?

How does the setting in the lottery affect the story?

The setting evokes a pleasant mood. However, Jackson uses irony to create a surprise ending that leaves a lasting impact on a reader. While the setting and mood make the lottery seem like a happy occurrence, in reality, the opposite is true. The winner of the lottery is stoned to death by the townspeople.

How does the reader’s point of view change in the lottery by Shirley Jackson?

Answer Expert Verified. How does the reader’s point of view on the lottery change over the course of the story? In the Lottery, Shirley Jackson uses third-person perspective, which means that we do not know what the characters are actually thinking.

How does the author use setting in the lottery?

The author’s use of setting, especially one so warm and friendly feeling, helps to develop a theme of appearance versus reality in “The Lottery.” The small farming community may have the look of goodness and simplicity, but their reliance on the dark and threatening lottery system belies this carefully constructed …

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What does the setting symbolize in The Lottery?

The setting of the story is important because it helps create the ironic tension between what the inhabitants should be like and how they actually are. The setting is a “modern” small town for Jackson’s time, with a traditional belief system.

What are the settings of The Lottery?

The setting of Shirley Jackson’s short story “The Lottery” takes place in a small, nondescript town located in rural America on the morning of June 27th. Jackson describes the weather on the day of the lottery as being pleasant, clear, and warm, which gives the reader a sense of tranquility and optimism.

Why does Tessie think The Lottery is unfair?

Tessie thinks the lottery is unfair because she won. If someone else won, she would not have complained at all. … This is an example of situational irony in that the readers do not expect that the winner of the lottery will be killed.

Why was Tessie Hutchinson singled out as the winner?

Tessie Hutchinson is singled out as the “winner” because she protested against the tradition of the lottery by saying “it isn’t fair.” As she protested, everyone even her own husband and three children joined in stoning her to death.

What is the setting of The Lottery Why is it important?

The setting of the story is important because it helps create the ironic tension between what the inhabitants should be like and how they actually are. … The setting is a “modern” small town for Jackson’s time, with a traditional belief system.

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Why do the townspeople agree to take part in the lottery?

Why do the townspeople agree to take part in the lottery and turn against each other? Answer: Because they are afraid that not continuing with the lottery would bring them bad luck. Explanation: … The villagers refuse to give up the lottery because they believe that this ritual ensures good harvest.

What is the plot twist of the lottery?

By Shirley Jackson

Jackson defers the revelation of the lottery’s true purpose until the very end of the story, when “the winner,” Tess Hutchison, is stoned to death by friends and family. This shocking event marks a dramatic turning point in how we understand the story.

How * does * the * Author * Shirley * Jackson * foreshadow * what * is * to * come ?*?

Jackson starts to foreshadow the climax by creating some anticipation with the children and when the black box was pulled out. … She also foreshadows it when Mrs. Hutchinson says that it is not fair, when the Hutchinson family was pulled the first time.

Where is the setting of the story lottery?

Answer: The setting of “The Lottery” is, according to Shirley Jackson, her village of Bennington, Vermont: … In her story, Jackson’s village is a rural area, surrounded by other such villages with people who have lived narrow lives and, perhaps as a result of such lives, appear to have narrow minds, as well.

Why does the author use symbolism in The Lottery?

In “The Lottery,” Shirley Jackson uses imagery and symbolism to develop theme. … One of the themes of the story is questioning the blind following of traditions, and Jackson wants the reader to understand that traditions are part of all cultures in all places, thus depicting the village as an “ordinary” place.

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Influence of gambling