How is irony displayed in the lottery?

In Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery” irony is an underlying theme used throughout the story. The setting is introduced as a “clear and sunny” day, but ends with the brutal death of a housewife (715). The two people who essentially run the town, Mr. … The plot as a whole in “The Lottery” is filled with ironic twists.

What is the main irony of the lottery?

The main irony in Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery” occurs because a lottery is something someone generally wants to win, but this lottery results in the brutal death of its winner. In fact, through much of the story, the lottery seems like a good thing.

What is the main symbol of the lottery?

The lottery represents any action, behavior, or idea that is passed down from one generation to the next that’s accepted and followed unquestioningly, no matter how illogical, bizarre, or cruel. The lottery has been taking place in the village for as long as anyone can remember.

How is the end of the story the lottery ironic?

The irony in the ending of the story was how the once loving family was now resentful towards each other. … The irony lies at the end of the book, when you realise with horror that the winner is not so lucky after all. The “prize” of the lottery is a public stoning.

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What Is the Lottery a metaphor for?

The shabby and splintered box that holds the lottery tickets is a metaphor for the increasingly worn and outdated lottery ritual. The black color of the box can be compared to the darkness of the lottery, which ends in the death of a community member at the hands of his or her neighbors.

Why is the ending of the lottery so shocking?

Jackson defers the revelation of the lottery’s true purpose until the very end of the story, when “the winner,” Tess Hutchison, is stoned to death by friends and family. This shocking event marks a dramatic turning point in how we understand the story.

What is an example of dramatic irony in the lottery?

When she is picked, she begins to yell that the process is unfair. So, for her the lottery is an example of dramatic irony. Something that she thought unimportant becomes fatal for her. When the reader learns at the end of the story that the “prize” is death, is certainly situational irony.

What does Tessie symbolize in The Lottery?

Tessie is symbolic of the scapegoat in “The Lottery,” which is sacrificed in ritual atonement for the sins of the tribe. However, she is also an average member of the tribe who sees nothing wrong with the system until she is selected.

Influence of gambling