What is the setting of the book The Lottery by Shirley Jackson?

The setting of “The Lottery” is, according to Shirley Jackson, her village of Bennington, Vermont: … In her story, Jackson’s village is a rural area, surrounded by other such villages with people who have lived narrow lives and, perhaps as a result of such lives, appear to have narrow minds, as well.

Where did the story the lottery take place?

The lottery in Shirley Jackson’s ”The Lottery” takes place in the town square in a village.

What is the setting of the lottery and why is it important?

The setting of the story is important because it helps create the ironic tension between what the inhabitants should be like and how they actually are. The setting is a “modern” small town for Jackson’s time, with a traditional belief system.

How does the author use setting in the lottery?

The author’s use of setting, especially one so warm and friendly feeling, helps to develop a theme of appearance versus reality in “The Lottery.” The small farming community may have the look of goodness and simplicity, but their reliance on the dark and threatening lottery system belies this carefully constructed …

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Why was Tessie Hutchinson singled out as the winner?

Tessie Hutchinson is singled out as the “winner” because she protested against the tradition of the lottery by saying “it isn’t fair.” As she protested, everyone even her own husband and three children joined in stoning her to death.

What is the irony in The Lottery?

The plot as a whole in “The Lottery” is filled with ironic twists. The whole idea of a lottery is to win something, and the reader is led to believe that the winner will receive some prize, when in actuality they will be stoned to death by the rest of the villagers.

How does the setting affect the plot of The Lottery?

The setting effects the story because the lottery and stoning will be quick. … The setting evokes a pleasant mood. However, Jackson uses irony to create a surprise ending that leaves a lasting impact on a reader. While the setting and mood make the lottery seem like a happy occurrence, in reality, the opposite is true.

Is the setting of The Lottery effective?

Shirley Jackson effectively uses setting in “The Lottery” to foreshadow an ironic ending. … The setting set forth by Shirley Jackson in the beginning of the story creates a mood of peacefulness and tranquility. It also creates a visual image in the mind of the reader of a typical town on a normal summer day.

What is the main conflict of The Lottery?

Person versus society is the major conflict in “The Lottery” because the conflict revolves around Tessie Hutchinson’s struggle against her town, the citizens of which insist on observing a ritual of sacrifice each year in blind adherence to tradition.

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Who is the antagonist in The Lottery?

Tessie Hutchinson is the protagonist in “The Lottery”. The lottery itself is the antagonist.

What is the theme of The Lottery?

Violence and Cruelty

Violence is a major theme in “The Lottery.” While the stoning is a cruel and brutal act, Jackson enhances its emotional impact by setting the story in a seemingly civilized and peaceful society.

What is the plot of The Lottery?

The plot of “The Lottery” involves the selection of a lottery “winner” out of the residents of a small fictitious town. The “winner” will be sacrificed to ensure that the year’s crops are good.

Influence of gambling